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in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
has stressed that the role of the u.s. military would be limited in time and scope. our mission has been to use america's unique capabilities to create the conditions for the no-fly zone and to assist in meeting urgent humanitarian needs. as expected, we're already seeing a significant reduction in the number of u.s. planes involved in our operations as the number planes from other countries increase in numbers. today we are taking the next step. we have agreed, along with our nato allies, to transition command and control for the no-fly zone over libya to nato. all 28 allies have also now authorized military authorities to develop an operations plan for nato to take on the broader civilian protection mission under resolution 1973. nato is well-suited to coordinate this international effort and ensuring that all participating nations are working effectively together toward our shared goals. this coalition includes countries beyond nato including arab partners, and we expect all of them to be providing important political guidance going forward. we have always said that arab leer lea
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
by the president where u.s. military participation here would end. >>> plus, a troubling turn in japan. workers are pulled from the crippled reactor complex after smoke is seen rising from two of the reactors overnight. how big a setback is this? >>> it's monday, march 21st, 2011. i'm willie geist. chuck and savannah are traveling with the president in south america. we will hear from them later this hour. >>> let's get right to the run down, we begin with operation odyssey dawn in libya. punishing air strikes drove pro-gadhafi forces further from home base last night though it is unclear where gadhafi is at this hour. rebels celebrated after u.s., british and french planes demolished libyan tanks and took out air defenses. overnight the opposition said it had regained almost 40 miles of territory. colonel gadhafi appears to have escaped harm in the attack on his administration building. he has though warned of a long war and said he'd open up the government's arsenal to arm his supporters. >>> on sunday defense secretary robert gates reiterated that the u.s. has no plans to send in ground forc
that it will be brief. he will be speaking from the u.s. army right here in the nation's cap tell and speaking to a country that has mixed feelings about the third military intervention in the past decade and not to convince that this mission has a clear goal or exit strategy. the commander in chief will be speaking about how long and decision to intervening here and the united states and violence against demonstrators in bahrain, syria, another hot spot in the middle east. wolf blitzer will rejoin us before and after the president's big address, including anderson cooper as well as reports from inside experience team and great experience team of analysts. let's begin on the ground in libya. we'll check out the map. one clear result if you take a close look at the air strikes and remove here, i want to go back to march 18th. the day before the strikes began, the day before, you can see right here in red, these were towns just before, just before the strikes began. controlled red meaning controlled by the regime. look where we are today. controlled green. that is controlled by the opposition. t
, this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. pentagon officials say so far the u.s. spent $580 million on the libyan conflict. while we're committed to the operation financially, militarily and diplomatically, questions remain about what it will mean to deem the mission a success. james rosen is at the state department. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. president obama and top commanderrers pushed forward on the parallel and separate path to strip muammar gaddafi of his ability to wage war and pressuring him to resign. today a top nato commander said the missions may connect over time in london, secretary of state hillary clinton met with colleagues from the united nations, europe and arab league to sketch out end game in libya. clinton said arming the libyan rebels were not discussed and only vaguely did she address growing speculation that gaddafi will receive asylum. >> we believe he must go. we're working with the international community to try to achieve that outcome. and look for political resolution which could include leaving the country. >> bret: we are not engaged and
libya's air defenses. the u.s. and british military fired a total of 124 tomahawk cruise missiles. u.s. officials say they are getting ready to hand over operational control of the military mission. >> we expect in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we'll be a member of the coalition. we'll have a military role in the coalition. we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> let's get the military perspective on this from cnn's pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. let's start with secretary gates pledge to hand over control in just a couple days. first, what exactly does that mean and is it realistic? >> what it means is they are looking now to set up some sort of structure by which another entity could take control that could be nato although i've been told by a source that there is some reluctance to fly under a nato flag and another thing is so up a separate command and control structure. in one key area u.s. participation may have already peaked this morning. i was told just this morning by an offi
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
congress to continue to be involved. nancy pelosi said u.s. action will be strengthened by consultation with congress. last week a lot of them spoke under the democratic side were critical of president obama for not briefing congress in regards to what the mission was in libya. they feel on the democratic side more aware of what that is and want to be briefed regularly. secretary of state hillary clinton will be beyond with the foreign relations committee. they expect a lot of questions to her, but in terms of setting a precedent for the democratic party to believe in, president obama did accomplish that goal. he did not satisfy republicans at all. one interesting caveat i will say, senator john mccain, the president's opponent actually said he enjoyed hearing president obama clearly state what the policy was in libya. he remained shall we say unaware of how gadhafi would be removeed from power. he would like more information about that, but supportive of what the president's actions were there. john mccain maybe going back to the maverick style by being more supportive of president oba
american fighters jets are active at the moment, u.s. pilots flew 113 of the 175 coalition air sorties yesterday, for example, that u.s. role will shrink dramatically in the next few days leaving others to decide on military targeting. on the ground all public signals from the regime suggest continued defiance and continued attacks on the opposition. but here's the intriguing nugget. senior u.s. officials tell cnn tonight that some members of gadhafi's inner circle are reaching out to the state department and reaching out to other arab nations, as well. curious contacts to say the least but as yet our sources tell us no indication gadhafi himself is looking to negotiate an exit strategy. >> i think there are any number of possible outcomes here, and no one is in a position to predict them. whether they're -- whether there are major further defections or divisions within his family, there are a variety of possibilities that seems to me. >> a variety of possibilities but listen here, secretary gates isn't betting on a peaceful settlement. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show
denouncing their president hosni mubarak. egypt is a major beneficiary of u.s. foreign aid. the u.s. was in the awkward position of supporting the pro-democracy demonstrators without alienating a longtime ally. after weeks of bloody confrontations in tahrir square, longtime president mubarak stepped down. now to libya. click on it, and gives you the latest developments and everything you need to know. libya has become the focal point of this historic movement. rebels dwept into dozens of key cities until moammar gadhafi unleashed military forces on his own people and that prompted nato to get involved with strategic air strikes. this fever has now spread to syria. again, all of the information on cnn.com. bahrain, of course, on the map here and also in yemen as well. anything can happen. john? >> and truly important questions coming out of this, what's going to happen next and why is this happening? mohammed jamjoon is live in abu dab toe answer some of these questions. let's start with syria. it appears the arab awakening is there. president assad is facing a tough choice with viol
in the price of crude equals to a $40 billion withdrawal of funds from the u.s. economy. that's just america's stats of the take that around the world and see how bad it is to have crude go higher. this is a serious problem. we need to stop crude from going higher and certainly pulling the speculators from the market is a way to slow down the price movement because if you do not have reason to take delivery, you would not just be buying for a pure speculator to make money. >>neil: but you physically have to have the oil. interesting. thank you very much. >>guest: thank you for having me. >>neil: coalition forces flying 175 anythings over libya but they will not get him from the united arab emirates refusing to join blaming the decision on "u.s. policies toward bahrain," which is facing its own revolt. and our guest says if they will not get involved, why are we? the former head of the c.i.a. osama bin laden unit, and i don't buy their reason. how bahrain is an excuse, that strikes me as them getting cold feet on looking like they are participating in an arab crackdown. >>guest: i think it is
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
the american people what the u.s. role is in this mission. plenty of confusion right now on that front. >>> in japan, water with radiation levels 100,000 times the norm. and fears that some of it might be in the pacific ocean. >>> in libya, rebel forces are marching toward the capital. and after a weekend of key victories, the most pivotal fight may now be under way. cnn's resa is in libya where rebels seem to have seized the momentum. first off why the turnaround? >> i'm sorry, carol, i couldn't hear you. >> i just asked you why the turnaround for the libyan rebels? >> well, i think it had a lot to do with the air strikes. the coalition air strikes that started saturday. and there's no question that the momentum has shifted. i don't think too many people could have predicted in a matter of three days, these opposition forces would gain about 200 miles in territory and capture about five key cities. but that's exactly what has happened. the latest town to go into the habds of opposition forces, the town of ben jawad. and i think this surge, this shift in momentum started on saturday wi
. of course, it's been french, british, u.s. fighter jets that have been launching most of the air strikes. again, today another set of air strikes, according to a french official, in or near tripoli targeting a command center, brooke. >> reza, here is a new town, we're all learning, gadhafi's birthplace. we know the rebels are moving westward toward sirte. is that the next big battle, symbolic battle as well, for rebels here? >> reporter: well, it looks like it's the first battle in about three days. the opposition forces over the past 72 hours have been making it look relatively easy, rolling toward the west. this is the first time they're seeing resistance, little bit of fighting. that's probably because sirte is the hometown, the birthplace of colonel gadhafi. he has a lot of supporters, not clear how many have remained in this location. his tribe is based out of this place. rebel fighters telling cnn they're seeing some resistance, telling us that gadhafi loyalists using sha containry, trickery. one rebel fighter telling us that it looks like civilians have been armed. opposition figh
this country ask, why is the u.s. part of this operation? his own defense secretary telling abc news today this is not a vital national interest. so, as the president prepares to address the nation tomorrow, can he convince americans that the u.s. should be involved in this operation? as the u.s. hands over power to nato, what is the end game for american forces? and will there be a deal for gadhafi to get him out? david kerley leads us off at the white house tonight. david? >> reporter: good evening, david. the administration attacked the air waves today, making its case a week into the bombing of libya, a day before the president's big speech. and even the president's own defense secretary admitted on abc's "this week" that libya did not pose a threat. >> do you think libya posed an actual imminent threat to the united states? >> no, no. it was not -- it was not a vital national interest to the united states. but it was an interest. >> reporter: an interest, gates says, because gadhafi threatened to slaughter his own people. facing congressional and public criticism, the president in his
we think this is going to be? can they make up for these losses? >> u.s. investors are rattled. coach shares are down 8%, but if you look at the long-term outlook, it looks a little better for these retailers. it's going to take a few months, but japanese contention there will eventually rebound, and what they're doing right now is pushing hard into china trying to grow their businesses. also here in the u.s., we see the demand for luxury goods improving that's rebounding with the economic recovery here in the u.s. suzanne? >> all right, allison, thank you. appreciate it. >>> we want to go beyond the headlines now on the recovery of those two airmen after their fighter jet crashed in libya. we're learning more about how the chain of events played out. u.n. forces rescued the pilot and libyans found the weapons officer. >> i am speaking with him and i kiss him and i tell him you are coming for us. you are our brothers. so don't be afraid. you will be safe. we will carry you anyplace you want. >> for more details on the crash and the recovery, i want to bring in our pentagon corresponde
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
a command center. of course, it's been french jets, british jets and u.s. jets that have launched most of the air strikes. >> reza, we were told from the beginning that allied air pour power is only really protecting civilians. is that meaningful at this point? >> well, at this point there's no question. it's facilitating the push by the opposition forces west towards tripoli, the final destination. look at march 19th. that was the date when this no-fly zone was put in place. that's when opposition forces started pushing west. on saturday the air strikes softened up the artillery units. then it was brega, ras lanuf. the first little bit of resistance. the air strikes are pivotal in the progress of the rebel forces. >> and nato is supposed to take control of the no-fly zone today and the whole operation by the end of the week. does this matter to the rebels? do they feel this is what's helping them? >> it will matter if the air strikes are deescalated. with nato taking control, there are some member states that are not as enthusiastic as others about the aggressive nar of the air strike
to our correspondent with the opposition right now. president obama tried to explain why the u.s. intervened military as gadhafi was closing in on benghazi a little more than a week ago. >> at this particular moment, we were faced with the prospect of violence on a horrific scale. we had a unique ability to stop that violence. an international mandate for action. a broad coalition preached to join us. the support of arab countries, and a plea for help from the libyan people themselves. we also had the ability to stop gadhafi's forces in their tracks without putting american troops on the ground. to brush aside america's responsibility as a leader and more profoundly our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances, would have been a betrayal of who we are. >> a lot more on what the president said in a moment. we'll also look tonight in an incredibly disturbing incident that looked at a tripoli hotel full of journalists. this woman was dragged away by gadhafi officials, we have updates about what's happened since. i'll talk to nick robert son about it. the
upper level winds that actually transport that into parts of kansas, the u.s., and many other places. and before all is said and done, i would not be surprised if you could find trace amounts of this all the way over to europe. but i have to tell you, this is very, very harmless. this is not a big deal. if you're walking out to your car in bright sunlight, chances are you might be exposed to more radiation than that than these particles across the globe. >> it does still, of course, make you think twice when you hear about it. but hearing it's harmless is good. >>> in a few minutes, we'll be talking more about all of this with a disaster expert about containment efforts in japan. he led numerous expeditions into some of the most contaminated areas of chernobyl. >>> to libya now, and rebels getting closer to moammar gadhafi's doorstep gaining ground with new coalition air strikes. nato now says it will take over the entire military mission there, not just the no-fly zone. so far the u.s. has supplied nearly all the fire power according to pentagon figures. the u.s. military has launch
, one possibility an all-out u.s. assault. that i think the president doesn't want to do, promised the nation he wouldn't do that but how do you turn this thing around on the ground? and there's no -- increasingly, the pessimism is setting in on that front. so it's the other alternative. we don't yet see regime change, but as you just reported we've now seen a regime crack and the biggest -- the best bet for the administration increasingly is the regime will crack from within. >> the question there, david, does gadhafi see the defection of a long-term close comfortanf and say i need to read that tea leave as go or lash out and then the question is what happens? and to your point about, you know, maybe the president is being advised he needs to do more than this but now they're telling congress, $40 million a week which is a lot of money but in the scope of a big military intervention a lot less money than iraq or afghanistan. if they commit to that backseat role but then gadhafi sits there, don't they need could to come back and say never mind, we need to up this? >> yeah, i think
operations, including ground attacks, taking over from the u.s.-led force. for more on what's happening with the rebel advance, we want to go to benghazi and richard engel. richard? >> reporter: the rebels here in eastern libya have never been stronger. they have regained in the last 24 hours all of the ground and more that they lost when gadhafi launched a counteroffensive. that counteroffensive which triggered western military intervention. after takinga ag ajdabiya yeste, there was no resistance and they were able to push about 100 miles after ajdabiya drive toward the west without any kind of resistance at all. we drove along this road and we saw on the side of the road the reason why they were able to make such an easy advance. dozens of gadhafi's armored vehicles and tanks that were completely obliterated from the sky. it has opened a corridor that the rebels are now just walking through. the rebels are concerned, however, that as there is this change of command, as nato takes more responsibility, that there will be a less aggressive military posture, a less aggressive series of a
of america has done what we said we would do. >> ok. so last night, he was talking about my leadership. u.s. led. go back 10 days ago, we didn't hear that. listen to this montage. >> in this effort, the united states is prepared to act as part of an international coalition. american leadership is essential. but that does not mean acting alone. in this effort, the united states is acting with a broad coalition. make no mistake, today we are part of a broad coalition. our goal is focused. our cause is just. and our coalition is strong. >> well, so that's the president as he evolved into this position and i think one of the many columnists who looked to the speech and analyzed the speech and said it best, this is a good speech if he said it 11 days ago, he would have quieted 95% of the critics. i would have found a way to give the secretary of state some credit. >> no kidding. she got him into this thing. >> it's amazing how much stuff you can do if you don't mind who gets the credit. that would have been a perfect time with hillary clinton leading -- secretary of state hillary clinton leadi
their sites on qaddafi's hometown of surt. just the same, a top u.s. military official says the rebels are not a robust fighting force and their gains may not be permanent. mandy clark is with the rebels in ras lanuf. >> this could be the midwest decisive battle yet in libya's civil war. in the span of just 48 hours, the ragtag army of students, laborers and some soldiers once loyal to the regime are now threatening qaddafi's hometown. the push west would have been impossible without coalition air strikes that pounded qaddafi's tanks and troops and trapped rebels in ajdabiya. allied air raids forced the regime's army into full retreat, allowing the rebels to retake control of the key oil hubs of brega and ras lanuf. despite those gains, these men are moving cautiously. they want to avoid traps set by qaddafi's forces. the first push to tripoli ended here in bin jiwad. rebels, believing residents were on their side, were led into a deadly ambush. now they say they've learned from that costly mistake. rebels say they're now doing clearing operations. >> ( translated ): we have learned to
their leaders. listen. one u.s. ally calls the situation there, quote, deteriorating rapidlyof. remember, some officials are calling yemen the new wild west for al qaeda terrorists. we'll get to all of that in a minute. >>> first, mubarak is gon in egypt. gadhafi is under siege in libya. is bashar assad next? that's the question today rumbling across the middle east because the spark of rolution s reached the arab powerhouse syria. this is damascus today.ot antigovernment protests spread to the syrian capital and beyond. here's where it started, daraa, south of damascus. believe it or not, we are told with all the arrests about a month ago, a dozenz teen sz ho it started. they were arrested for spraying antigovernment graffiti. then on wednesday, this government forces opened fire in daraa. accounts remain sketchy, but the tape we're about to watch does give us some idea. as we sa, the exact circumstances remain unclear, as do the numberof deaths. but yesterday the government conceded it made a mistake and announced new reforms. today's sponse from the sreet suggests that may not be enough. w
hands. he has not been given any immunity from the u.s. there will be no immunity from prosecution there either. it remains to be seen what happens to moussa koussa. they wanted information but they may also want to put him on trial in the future, shep. >> shepard: complicated. jonathan hunt will be chatting away with you if you so choose. go over to the fox news .com/shep. appears i'm wearing my glasses on that thing. that's weird. click the on the hunt thing on the right and join the conversation. he is a great conversationist, that jonathan hunt. enjoy him. >> colonel qaddafi today warning the west that they have started something in libya they cannot control meaning we. in a statement to libyan television qaddafi says the leaders who decided to launch a crusader war between christians and muslims it is they who have stricken with madness. it will be out of their control no matter what methods of detraction they have at their disposal. this comes from a dictator who pleasantly blamed the uprising in libya on bin laden and protesters fueled by nescafe spiked by hallucinogenic dru
john mccain wants the u.s. and others to arm the rebels. he says the president needs to clarify the purpose, the costs and duration of the operation. >> this policy has been characterized by confusion and indecision and delay. it is no wonder that americans are confused as to what our policy is. on the one hand, they say it is humanitarian and the other hand they say gadhafi must go. >> president obama will speak on the libyan mission tonight. he will speak from the national defense university in washington. we get started at 7:00 p.m. eastern. 4:00 out west. >>> in london, british prime minister david cameron is making a statement on the libyan opposition. he is organizing for a transition process. a conference will be held in london tomorrow. it is designed to outline the political framework for the way ahead in libya. >>> now the syrian government may bow to protesters and demands analyst the emergency law that has been in place for 50 years now. the president is expected to address the nation soon and dozens of protesters have been killed since demonstrations began just nine
on "good morning america" and appeared to be suggesting that the u.s. is considering a request to arm the rebel opposition. some members of the coalition are pushing for this, but there are open questions about who the opposition is. i asked a pentagon official just that yesterday. >> we're not talking with the opposition. we have -- we would like a much better understanding of the opposition. we don't have it. so, yes, it does matter to us, and we're trying to fill in those knowledge gaps. >> reporter: that includes questions about towns in eastern libya, which have a history of anti-american activity and have served as recruiting zones in towns like darnah. in april, 2008, a massive intelligence find in northern iraq showed 19% of the suicide bombers in iraq came from darnah, libya. "newsweek" did a cover story on this in april, 2008, focusing on darnah and the recruitment by al-qaeda of suicide bombers in the libyan town. we've asked the state department about it and have been told that they're not doing interviews on the issue of the opposition at this point in time. megyn? megyn:
to school. kept the lights on during a calm day at the wind farm. heated 57 million u.s. homes. simmered grandma's chicken noodle soup. melted tons of recycled glass. roasted millions of coffee beans. provided electricity for nearly 29 million home computers. heated your bathwater. cooked your takeout. lit your way home. we helped america import less of its energy. cleared the air by burning cleaner than other fuel sources, with less pollutants and no mercury. and tomorrow, we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. learn more at anga.us. basic. preferred. at meineke i have options on oil changes. and now i get free roadside assistance with preferred or supreme. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> a live picture of flight tracker.com, you can see there behind me, those are all the planes that are in the air right now. imagine, though, what would happen if they had to land without the help of air traffic control? that actually did happen to two planes at washington's reagan national airport shortly after m
hear last week, general carter hamm leading the u.s. effort there to enforce the no-fly zone, describing misrata specifically and saying it was very difficult to know exactly where the opposition was, exactly where the government was, exactly where the civilians were and exactly where these heavy weapons were because they are hideing in houses. as we drove out of misrata yesterday we saw soldiers with their vehicles hiding inside buildings, inside buildings. they had driven in through the store fronts and hiding inside the stores and the tanks hiding under trees, so this makes it very, very hard for aircraft to see these heavy weapons and to target them easily without the fear of injuring civilians and that is the challenge that these aircraft flying overhead are facing right now, carol. >> nic robertson reporting live in tripoli, thanks. >>> president obama goes on television to face a war weary nation that would be our own, he says ignoring moammar gadhafi threats of slaughtering civilians would have betrayed our values as americans, but he said using the military to force
in pushing back gadhafi forces but so far no concrete details on an end game as to u.s. or foreign involvement. in fact, we heard the pentagon just this afternoon doubling down on this mission. >> we're going to continue to pursue all actions necessary to make him comply with the security council resolution 1973. >> well first egypt, now libya, and it does not stop there know that. yemen, bahrain, syria. what remains a question is whether the u.s. support for the freedom fighters in one country will spread to the others? let's start things off with robert powell, middle east analyst. what's playing out in libya period? >> well, it's essentially a rag tag rebel army, tribal elements plus a regimeç that's been in place for who 26 years and now obviously western military forces have weighed in to deal with gadhafi and his behavior. >> is the end game a failed state, one new country out of benghazi and another new country out of tripoli? >> it's difficult given how the situation is to give an answer. given how weak the forces are, how ill-equipped, difficult to avoid the partition sc
of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 80% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. and more. if you replace 3 tablespoons of sugar a day with splenda® you'll save 100 calories a day. that could help you lose up to 10 pounds in a year. that's how splenda® is sweet...and more. so i wasn't playing much of a role in my own life. so now, i've got thleading part. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator, working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase you
what's happening on the ground, as you see the interviews with general hamm, the u.s. commander, africa commander, talk about this, clearly he's in charge right now. and presumably and everybody says will hand that off to a coalition, to nato, to be in charge at some point. secretary gates reiterated that again today. but in the meantime, it's -- it -- it seems to be an awkward situation for the military. on the other hand, no-fly zones, that's something we've done before. again, that's the tactic. that's not the end game. that's not the strategy. and that has jet to be revealed, i think. >> finally, general myers, if you were running the armed forces in this operation, what would be the one thing you would want clarity on from president obama? >> well, i think any person in the military, certainly anybody in the modern military in the last couple of decades at the strategic level worries about mission creep, having an undefined mission and allowing it to creep. i understand that prettyem with, having been -- pretty well, having been around in iraq and afghanistan. admiral mullen i'm su
life. for a woman in any country, in the u.s., egypt, libya, to come out and say she was raped. no one would do that unless they were raped especially in a conservative society. human rights watch have said girls and women who are survivors of rape are taken to because of the shame associated with rape. and these are centers where the girls and women are held as prisoners basically because -- >> they're not rehabilitated. >> social rehabilitation centers. >> held away from the rest of society. >> they're practically prisoners. >> that's the part that's most amazing. you've told you that sources say she's being held still even though they claim she's been set free. >> her mother and relatives have appeared on television and said that libyan officials have told them if she retracts the story, they'll release her. but gives me hope she's alive. but i won't believe she's alive until i see her. i was a journalist in libya, i went with a group of journalists in 1996, and they kept us in a hotel practically prisoners of gadha gadhafi's ministry of information. and during a news conference bec
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